Kalendarium

Physical activity and eating behaviour in sleep disorders

  • Datum: 2017-01-13 kl 13:00
  • Plats: Gunnesalen, Psykiatriens hus ingång 10, Uppsala
  • Föreläsare: Spörndly-Nees, Søren
  • Webbsida
  • Arrangör: Sjukgymnastik
  • Kontaktperson: Spörndly-Nees, Søren
  • Disputation

Disputation

Sleep-disordered breathing and insomnia are common sleep disorders and associated with an increased risk of morbidity. The aim of this thesis was to study the contribution of a behavioural sleep medicine perspective on sleep-disordered breathing and insomnia. More specific, factors considered important for changing eating behaviour and the impact of physical activity were studied.

Methods: In study I, semi-structured interviews of participants with obstructive sleep apnoea and obesity (n = 15) were analysed using a qualitative content analysis. A population-based female cohort was followed prospectively over ten years in study II and III using a postal questionnaire on two occasions (n = 4,851 and n = 5062, respectively). In study IV, a series of five experimental single-case studies was conducted testing how an aerobic exercise intervention affected selected typical snores, following an A1B1A2B2A3 design over nine days and nights (n = 5).

Results:  Facilitators and barriers towards eating behaviour change were identified. A low level of self-reported leisure-time physical activity was a risk factor among women for future habitual snoring complaints, independent of weight, weight gain alcohol dependence or smoking. Maintaining higher levels or increasing levels of leisure-time physical activity over the ten-year period partly protected from snoring complaints (study II). Further, a low level of self-reported leisure-time physical activity is a risk factor for future insomnia among women. Maintaining higher levels or increasing levels of leisure-time physical activity over the ten-year period partly protect against self-reported insomnia, independent of psychological distress, age, change in body mass index, smoking, alcohol dependence, snoring status or level of education (study III). Single bouts of aerobic exercise did not produce an acute effect on snoring the following nights in the studied individuals. A pronounced night-to-night variation in snoring was identified (study IV).

Conclusion: Women with sleep disorders would benefit from a behavioural sleep medicine perspective targeting their physical activity in the prevention and management of snoring and insomnia. This is motivated by the protective effects of physical activity confirmed by this thesis.

Knowledge was added about facilitators and barriers for future eating behaviour change interventions.