Kalendarium

Atrial Fibrillation in the setting of Coronary Artery Disease: Risks and outcomes with different treatment options

  • Datum: 2017-06-09 kl 13:00
  • Plats: Enghoffsalen, Akademiska sjukhuset, Ingång 50, Uppsala
  • Föreläsare: Batra, Gorav
  • Webbsida
  • Arrangör: Kardiologi
  • Kontaktperson: Batra, Gorav
  • Disputation

Disputation

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide and atrial fibrillation (AF) is a prevalent arrhythmia associated with increased risk of mortality and morbidity. Despite improved outcome in both diseases, there is a need to further describe the prevalence, outcome and management of CAD in patients with concomitant AF.

AF was a common finding among patients with MI, with 16% having new-onset, paroxysmal or chronic AF. Patients post-MI with concomitant AF, regardless of subtype, were at increased risk of composite cardiovascular outcome of mortality, MI or ischemic stroke, including mortality and ischemic stroke alone. No major difference in outcome was observed between AF subtypes. At discharge, an oral anticoagulant was prescribed to 27% of the patients with MI and AF undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Aspirin or clopidogrel plus warfarin versus dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin plus clopidogrel were associated with similar 0-90-day and lower 91-365-day risk of cardiovascular outcome, without increased risk of major bleeding events. Triple therapy with aspirin, clopidogrel plus warfarin versus dual antiplatelet therapy was associated with non-significant lower risk of cardiovascular outcome, but with increased risk of bleeding events. Treatment with renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors post-MI was associated with lower risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients with and without congestive heart failure and/or AF. However, RAS inhibition in patients without AF was not associated with lower risk of new-onset AF. Approximately 1 in 3 patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) had pre- or postoperative AF. Patients with AF, regardless of subtype, were at higher risk of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality and congestive heart failure. Furthermore, postoperative AF was associated with higher risk of recurrent AF.

In conclusion, AF was a common finding in the setting of MI and CABG. AF, irrespectively if in the setting of MI or CABG was associated with higher risk of ischemic events and mortality. Also, postoperative AF was associated with recurrent AF. Oral anticoagulants post-MI and PCI in patients with AF was underutilized, however, optimal antithrombotic therapy is still unknown. RAS inhibition post-MI seems beneficial, however, it was not associated with lower incidence of new-onset AF.