Human Diversity: Archaeology, Genetics, Cultural Evolution, Gender

  • Date:
  • Location: Gustavianum
  • Lecturer: Speakers include: Matthew Spriggs (Archaeology, Australian National University); Toomas Kivisild (Archaeology, University of Cambridge); Olivier Morin (Minds and Traditions research group, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History); Magnus Enqvist (Centre for Cultural Evolution, Stockholm University); N. Katherine Hayles (Literature, Duke University)
  • Organiser: Michael Dunn
  • Contact person: Michael Dunn
  • Phone: 018-4711341
  • Konferens

An interdisciplinary conference examining human diversity in the past, present, and future from many perspectives, including genetics, archaeology, cultural evolution, and gender. The conference is free of charge and open to staff, students and interested members of the public.

The Human Diversity Network is hosting a conference on the 1st and 2nd of November examining human diversity in the past, present, and future from many perspectives, including genetics, archaeology, cultural evolution, and gender.

Registration is free.

Programme

Thursday 1 Nov, Gustavianum Auditorium

10–11
Has the question of the origins of the Polynesians now been solved? Matthew Spriggs (Australian National Univ.)

11–12
The Lynx ladies. Female burials furnished with lynx skins: housewives and cult leaders? Torun Zachrisson (Upplands Museum)
Demographic History of Sama Dilaut sea nomads of Southwestern Philippines Maximilian Larena (EBC, UU)

12–14
Lunch

14–15
Genetic history of Siberian and New World populations
Toomas Kivisild (University of Cambridge)

15–16
How writing evolves (or fails to). Olivier Morin (Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History)

16–17
Thinking and cultural evolution. Magnus Enqvist (Centre for Cultural Evolution, Stockholm University)

Friday 2 Nov, Gustavianum auditorium

9–10
Frankenstein, Genetic Diversity, and our Posthuman Futures N. Katherine Hayles (Duke University)

10–12
Critical Infrastructures: Diversity and History through the Prism of Technology. Anna Foka (Digital Humanities, UU)
Between Humans and Animals: More-than-human Perspectives on Diversity. Jacob Bull (Gender Research, UU),
Rorschach on Birka? Contesting gender in the archaeology of a ‘female Viking warrior’ Neil Price (Archaeology, UU)